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2013 Conference Presenters and Presentation Descriptions

Track Topics - Forest Finance, Forest Legacy, Forest History, Backyard Woods, Forest Recreation, Woods Wildlife, Forest Health, Tending and Management, Landowner Resources, Making Your Woods Accessible, Wood Products, Forests and Water, Aesthetics and Biodiversity, and Forest Policy and Advocacy,

Forest Finance

Forest Products Industry: Economic Outlook
Thad Taylor, Loan Officer and Forester, AgChoice Farm Credit
Our forest products industry is recovering from six years of sluggish demand. How does a rural PA woodlot owner boil down national economic and housing data into something local and relevant? This presentation will discuss global forest products demand, U.S. housing construction and other trends which directly impact your local stumpage markets, mills and logging demand.
Approved for:  1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program.

Timber Taxation
Michael Jacobson, Professor of Forest Resources, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
An important component of forest management, and one of the largest expenses of managing woodlands, is taxes. We will discuss the types of taxes landowners may be liable for, including income, estate and property taxes, and ways to minimize their financial impact. Plus, we will discuss recent changes to Federal and Pennsylvania law and tax tips.
Approved for:  1.0 CFE credit, Category 2;1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

How to Improve the Forest Security on Your Property
Thad Taylor, Loan Officer and Forester, AgChoice Farm Credit
Is your woodland the most valuable asset on your balance sheet? For many private woodland owners the answer to this question is "Yes". Discover practical "how to" strategies to manage risk and minimize potential losses to your valuable woodland. No matter your acreage, a forest security plan is a critical component to all private woodland management plans.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Certification for Private Forest Landowners
Jim Grace, Goddard Chair in Forestry and Environmental Resources Conservation, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
The history and current status of Forest Certification systems in Pennsylvania and the U.S. will be covered. The relevance, use, and outlook of Forest Certification programs for private forest landowners will be discussed in detail.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

I Have Timber to Sell: Profitable Timber Sales and Marketing
David Jackson, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension – Centre County
Timber harvesting can be the single most important tool forest landowners use to achieve many of their objectives. Done properly, harvesting trees can improve wildlife habitat, establish a new forest, allow for future harvests, and enhance forest health, all while also generating income. Harvesting is not a process to be taken lightly as it has both long and short term consequences for the land and the landowner. This presentation will assist landowners in understanding the timber sale process. It is the first step in helping landowners understand some of the consequences and how they can ensure a successful timber harvest.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Non-Timber Forest Products from Penn’s Woods: Income and Recreation Opportunities for Forest Landowners
Eric Burkhart, Program Director, Plant Science, Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center
This workshop will review popular non-timber forest products in Pennsylvania including ginseng, ramps/wild leeks and mushrooms. Identification, income opportunities, husbandry options, and stewardship guidelines will be discussed for those interested in NTFPs as a source of income, pleasure and/or for personal use.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Understanding and Negotiating a Gas Lease
David Messersmith, Extension Educator, Penn State Extension Wayne County
Oil and gas leases have provided financial windfalls for many Pennsylvania forest landowners in recent years. However, it’s important for landowners to fully understand the terms and conditions of a lease before signing on the dotted line. This presentation will provide an overview of leasing considerations, tips for lease negotiation and a discussion of the current leasing ‘market.’
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Agroforestry Opportunities for Forest Landowners
Tracey Coulter, Reforestation Coordinator, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
An overview of the five main agroforestry practices: forest farming, windbreaks, riparian forest buffers, silvopasture, alley cropping, as well as a short-rotation woody biomass.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Legacy

Private Forest Conservation after the Great Recession
Josh Parrish, Director of Land Conservation, The Nature Conservancy
Launched in late 2009, the Working Woodlands Program in Pennsylvania provides integrated land conservation solutions to landowners. At no out-of-pocket cost, the Program combines working forest easements, forest certification, and ecosystem markets in a seamless package enabling landowners to maximize their ecological and economic property values.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

The Future Owners of “Your Woods”: Getting Started with Successional Planning
Adam Downing, Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Virginia Tech University
Forestland owners generally embrace sustainable forestry practices and are not opposed to making management decisions that shape the next rotation of timber. Making decisions to positively impact the next generation of owners, however, is often more difficult. Yet succession planning is arguably more important toward ensuring Penn’s Woods will be part of the future. This presentation will consider and challenge landowners with the first steps of succession planning such as family communication.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Passing on Personal Possessions: Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate? … Who Should Get My Chainsaw?
Sanford Smith, Natural Resources and Youth Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Estate planning sessions often focus on titled property, such as: land, houses, cars, stocks, bonds, and savings accounts. Too often, non-titled property doesn’t get discussed. Non-titled property can include things like furniture, photos, occupational tools, jewelry, and even special articles of clothing. For many people, personal items carry more meaning and more importance than titled property. They may have fond memories of grandparents, parents, or other loved ones using these items in their homes or occupations. Have you and your family talked about the transfer on non-titled property after you or they die? This session addresses this sensitive issue and gives you some ideas and suggestions for successful ways of passing on personal possessions. Copies of the award winning Extension guide and publication, “Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate?” will be available for purchase after the presentation.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Learning Your Forest Legacy – and Adding Your Chapter
Susan Stout, Project Leader, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station
Chances are your forest existed before you were born, and will outlive you. Whether your ownership is part of a long chain of family stewardship, or something recent and short-term, there are wonderful ways to learn about your forest history and to contribute records of your own stewardship. This talk will explore these options with as much diversity as the author can muster and with respect for the variety of values that inspire people to own forests.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Cultivating the Next Generation of Forest Stewards
Sanford Smith, Natural Resources and Youth Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Many landowners want to cultivate a forest stewardship ethic in the hearts of their children - but they are uncertain how to do it. A love and appreciation for forests and the outdoors in an adult is almost always the result of an older person having shared this with them as a child. This session presents useful ideas and methods for passing on your stewardship ethic within your family and community. There are many excellent “people resources” and educational materials for you to tap into. There will also be an opportunity for participants to share what they have found to be effective and challenging in cultivating the next generation of forestland stewards.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Guidance for Financial Planning for Forest Landowners
Susan Lacy, Consulting Forester
Forestland in Pennsylvania is predominantly owned by families and individuals and a significant portion of those owners are over age 60. In the next 20-30 years, there will be a major shift in forest ownership in PA. Forest owner succession will have an impact on the management of these lands as well as the families. This presentation provides an overview of financial topics that will guide owners in making choices that will result in the outcomes they want for their future of their forestland. Topics include estate conservation, planning and taxes, tools and strategies, and developing the forest succession team.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Conservation Easements: Ensuring Good Stewardship After You're Gone
Andy Loza, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Land Trust Association
A conservation easement ensures that when your land passes to new owners, the land will be sustainably managed as you would have done. A conservation easement limits certain uses on the land in order to advance a specified conservation purpose such as ensuring sustainable forestry, providing wildlife habitat or protecting productive soils. It prevents all future owners of the land from developing or otherwise using the land contrary to the specified conservation purpose. This workshop will explain the basics of conservation easements and help attendees understand whether or not their goals and needs might fit with this conservation tool.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Irish Pines Tree Farm, LLC, A Multi-Generational Property Ownership Mode
Jeanne and Tony Riley, Pennsylvania Forest Landowners
This presentation will describe an innovative model for collaborative, multi-generational family ownership of a 113-acre tree farm located in Spruce Creek, Huntingdon County, PA. A local conservancy, Eden Hill Conservancy, holds a conservation easement on the property. Our model was designed to promote sound forest stewardship through continuity of property ownership across generations.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

How to Start on a Forest Legacy Plan
Moderated by Susan Benedict, PA Forest Landowner
People are unique and plans should be too. How to: take inventory of stakeholder interests and goals and find out what others see as the future of the property; talk with stakeholders individually and as a group; plan for seven generations; keep the rising generations interested and involved; and enjoy the place you love and let the kids do the work!
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Creating a Gifting Legacy
Mark Theiss, Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences, Development Office, and Michael Degenhart, Penn State Office of Gift Planning
For many forest landowners the land is an important part of their asset portfolio and they might be interested in making a gift of the land if they were assured that the land would not be developed in the future. Learn about the many tools available to you to ensure your philanthropic wishes are carried out as you consider your land and life legacy.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest History

Charcoal Making ... Has a Past, Present, and Future in Penn’s Woods
Adam Downing, Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Virginia Tech University, and Sandy Smith, Natural Resources and Youth Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Charcoal making played an important part in the history of Penn’s Woods and significantly impacted the forest we have today. Moreover, charcoal making has a promising future for hobbyists and entrepreneurs with an interest in utilizing poor quality wood. New technologies for making Natural Hardwood "LUMP" Charcoal and a resurgence in the market place for superior grilling fuel provide a unique opportunity for producing this value-added product. This presentation will briefly review the history of charcoal production and its use and explore new technologies for modern charcoal making. These “new” practices can add value to otherwise wasted wood and improve forest health at the same time.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program.

Life on the Colonial PA Frontier
Joe Harding, Director of Forestlands, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Who were the people that settled on the Colonial Pennsylvania Frontier; why did they come here, what conditions did the face and what skills did they need to have to survive.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2;1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Early Logging in Williamsport
Jim Walizer, Forest Landowner, Centre County
The presentation is a narrative with 50 slides of early logging photographs. It covers the time from 1807 to 1889 and shows how technology changed and how logging was done through the years.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Forensics
Charlie Schwarz, Land Protection Specialist, Northcentral Pennsylvania Conservancy
Learn about ways to look at the forest to understand its human-influenced history and how that helped to make it what we see today.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Backyard Woods

The Backyard Connection: How Landscaping Choices Change Pennsylvania Forests
Diane Oleson, Extension Educator, Penn State Extension – York County
We have a wealth of choices of trees, shrubs and plants that we can use in our backyards to enhance their beauty. But our choices can affect the woods nearby. There are many plant species sold for landscaping that escape from yards and infest woods and natural areas. What’s the big deal? Aren’t all plants the same? No, they are not. We will discuss invasive plants and insects their impacts on our woods, wildlife and even the water you drink. Native plants and their role in the ecosystem will be discussed as well as resources for identifying invasive species and locating suppliers for native species.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Invasive Plants in Your Woodlands and Backyards
Carrie Gilbert, Botanist, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Invasive plants are an increasing threat to Pennsylvania’s forests and native biodiversity. Learn how to identify common non-native invasive plants that may be impacting your woods and what you may be able to do about these invasives. Native look-alikes and alternatives will also be highlighted.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Habitat in your Backyard: an Alternative to Lawn
Katie Ombalski, Wildlife Biologist, ClearWater Conservancy
Have you ever considered why you spend so much effort maintaining your lawn? Why not consider creating an alternative that provides habitat for wildlife, reduces stormwater, and expense. 
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Keeping Your Trees Safe: Assessing Tree Risk in Mature Trees
Bill Elmendorf, Associate Professor, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Based on the new ANSI A-300 Tree Risk Assessment Standards, this presentation will provide an introduction to the process of tree risk assessment for large, mature trees. The presentation will use the International Society of Arboriculture's Tree Assessment Protocol and pictures of common tree defects to illustrate and teach tree risk assessment. Tree assessment tools such as the Resistograph will be briefly introduced and discussed.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Habitat Triage for the Backyard Woods
Adam Downing, Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Virginia Tech University
Landowners often feel stymied when faced with the multiple management needs and options they face with regard to the future of their piece of Penn’s Woods. This presentation will present considerations for ranking the importance of various management options within the context of the “do-it-yourself” woodlot owner who is new to the concepts of forest stewardship and management.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

You Invited Them… But Do You Really Want Them to Stay?
Gary San Julian, Professor Emeritus, Wildlife Resources, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Sciences and Management
Find out who's cohabitating in your chimney or developing an attitude in the attic or slithering through your salad greens. Check out who is dining in your den or hammering the hostas. Learn how to evict a murder of crows, a gaggle of geese, or a rhumba of rattlesnakes, and then you can decide whom you want to stay for dessert.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Recreation

Using Trail Cameras to Capture Wildlife
Gene Odato, District Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
We will discuss the use of trail cameras and other techniques to capture evidence of wildlife on your property. Now that you own a slice of heaven are you wondering what else inhabits the place? Are those crabapple trees or clover fields really drawing wildlife into them? Is that early successional habitat really drawing a crowd? We will discuss some tips and tricks when trying to verify wildlife on your property.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forests and Art:  How They Inspire
Dan Christ, Wildlife Artist, Dan Christ Gallery
We will explore how an artist sees the natural world compared to the average person. I will discuss how my upbringing and experiences in the outdoors have shaped my interests and focused my artwork. I will try to convey what elements go into creating a great painting and then challenge the landowner to envision their property as a started canvas on which to further develop a masterpiece of stewardship.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Birding Basics for Forest Landowners
Margaret Brittingham, Professor of Wildlife Resources, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Birds enliven a forest, help us understand and track ecological change, and mark the progression of the seasons. Learning to identify birds will help you become a better steward of your forest land while enhancing the enjoyment you get from being a forest landowner. Birding combines the challenge of the hunt with the thrill of discovery. You can bird anywhere and the only equipment you need is a pair of binoculars. This presentation will provide an overview of forest birds through the year, insights on what birds can tell us about our forest and why birds are important to forests, and an overview of the basics of birding. Attendees will learn how to identify 20 forest birds that every Pennsylvania forest landowner should know.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Maple Sugar
Bob Hansen, Extension District Director, Penn State Extension, Endless Mountains District
There are many options available in utilizing the resources of your woodlot. Do you think that “Making Maple” might be something you would like to try? Stay tuned for some basic information on making and marketing maple syrup and other maple products.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program.

Wild Mushrooms: From Foraging to Forest Farming
Eric Burkhart, Program Director, Plant Science, Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center
There are many reasons why one might want to forage for seasonal wild mushrooms in Pennsylvania (and the region) including for personal consumption, outdoor recreation and/or as a source of supplemental income. In this workshop, we’ll focus on all of these reasons and explore wild mushroom foraging and marketing in the region and how seasonal mushrooms can be used to enhance your diet and forest-based enterprise. We’ll also discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with cultivating or farming wild forest mushrooms in order to meet market demand. Mushrooms that will be discussed in this workshop will include morels, chanterelles, and shiitakes.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Your Back Woods Garden
Andy Duncan, Private Forestland Stewardship Coordinator, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
At certain times of the year a forest landowner may find certain things growing in the woods that are edible and delicious. However, you have to know when and where to look. We will explore the various edible items you may find in your woodlot, when and where to look and how to prepare them for eating.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Woods Wildlife

Managing Young Forest Habitat for Wildlife
Tammy Colt, Regional Wildlife Diversity Biologist, Pennsylvania Game Commission
Young forest or early successional habitat provides a diversity of food and cover that is used by game and nongame wildlife. Some wildlife species, like the golden-winged warbler, American woodcock, ruffed grouse, and eastern cottontail require this type of habitat. This presentation will focus on the species that live in young forests, how to create and optimize this habitat type, and sources of funding and technical assistance to help you manage this habitat.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Providing Quality Habitat for White-tailed Deer
Kip Adams, Wildlife Biologist & Northeast Regional Director, Quality Deer Management Association
Providing quality habitat for deer of all age classes is essential for any successful deer management program. This presentation discusses vegetation management from a forest, old field and food plot perspective, and explains how each fits into an overall habitat management plan providing the necessary food and cover for each season of the year.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Food Plots: Food Source Management
Jason Snavely, Certified Wildlife Biologist, Drop-Tine Wildlife Consulting
Developing a year-round food plot program primarily geared toward white-tailed deer. This talk would detail the importance of maximizing the health of white-tailed deer 365 days a year, identifying nutritional bottle necks and matching the proper food plot cultivar for each critical time period. The importance of providing maximum tonnage during the growing season by using high yielding warm season annuals as well as the key role that cool season annuals play in building body mass and preparing bucks for winter and rut-related stress will be discussed. Finally, the presentation will discuss why winter hardy perennials are vital to rebuilding rut and winter stressed whitetails. The importance of proper pH and fertility will be stressed.  Many photos documenting success will be shared.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

The Use of Conservation Organizations for Upland Bird Habitat Management
Linda Ordiway, Regional Wildlife Biologist, The Ruffed Grouse Society
Deciding to become responsible forest stewards by managing your property is the first step. Working with a conservation organization can help you further develop your wildlife objectives. There are particular enhancements you can do to benefit focal species like ruffed grouse or American woodcock that will also benefit species you may not be aware of. We will discuss the management methods beneficial to these two game birds, and why there is a need for the creation of this type of habitat for multiple wildlife species.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Ecology & Management of Vernal Pools
Justin Vreeland, Regional Wildlife Management Biologist, and Clayton Lutz, Regional Wildlife Diversity Biologist, Pennsylvania Game Commission
This presentation will provide an overview of the ecology and management of vernal pools of central Pennsylvania (specifically the ridge-and-valley physiographic province). The focus is on conservation measures used to protect and manage vernal pools and their surrounding forest matrix. Included are brief discussions of hydrologic regimens and vegetation structure of vernal pools and their use by wildlife, particularly herpetofauna.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

The Importance of Private Lands in the Golden-winged Warbler Young Forest Initiative
Emily Bellush, Working Lands for Wildlife Project and Conservation Manager, Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the Natural Resources Conservation Service
The Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) is a migratory songbird that breeds in young forest and shrubland habitats of eastern North America. The species has experienced significant population declines over that past 50 years and is currently a focal species for several efforts to create early successional breeding habitat in the Appalachian Mountains and Upper Great Lakes regions. A multi-agency effort to implement Golden-winged Warbler habitat management guidelines on public and private lands in Pennsylvania is currently underway. Since fall 2011, our multi-agency team has identified, prepared, and in some cases, implemented Golden-winged Warbler habitat management on over 12,000 acres within the Golden-winged Warbler Focal Conservation Area. Of these 12,000 acres, 3500 acres were on private lands funded through landowner incentive programs including USDA-NRCS-Working Lands for Wildlife and the PGC’s Voluntary Public Access Habitat Incentive Program. In this presentation, we will discuss the ecology the Golden-winged Warbler, the importance of young forest habitats to this songbird and associated wildlife, program funding opportunities, and provide a summary of project goals and achievements.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pennsylvania Bats
Cal Butchkoski, Wildlife Biologist III, Mammal Section, Pennsylvania Game Commission, Wildlife Diversity Division
This will be an introduction to the various species of bats in PA, their habitats, management and problems confronting these night flyers.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forestry for Birds: are Your Woods Bird-Friendly?
Sarah Sargent, Director of Science and NW IBA Coordinator, Audubon Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania forests provide breeding habitat for over 90 species of birds, many of which have suffered significant population declines over the last 45 years. For some of these species, Pennsylvania is the core of their breeding range and we have a high level of responsibility for their future populations. Audubon Pennsylvania is developing materials to assist forest landowners in understanding the role their forest plays in supporting these birds, as well as recommendations for bird-friendly forest management based on location and forest type. Find out which forest characteristics are important to key species of birds in different regions of Pennsylvania.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Appalachian Mountains Young Forest Initiative
Carl Graybill, Jr., Young Forest Habitat Biologist Contractor, Wildlife Management Institute
Provides information on the creation of the multi-state young forest initiatives and includes natural history information and best management practices for the American woodcock and golden-winged warbler. Additional emphasis will be made for the over 80 species of wildlife that are considered species of greatest conservation need that also require young forests for their survival.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Improving Wildlife Habitat in Your Woodland
Mario Giazzon, Regional Wildlife Diversity Biologist, Pennsylvania Game Commission
This presentation will focus on several habitat improvement practices that forest landowners can actively perform on their own property. This will include ways to capitalize on opportunities to improve habitat that arise during timber harvesting operations. Maintaining and/or enhancing existing key attributes of your forest, like snags, cavity trees, and diversity of tree and shrub species, is important and will be discussed in terms of their relevance to certain wildlife species. Attendees will gain a better understanding of what elements are most important to forest wildlife and begin to think in these terms as they enjoy forest-related activities.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Targeting Declining Species: The Wildlife Management Institute's Young Forest and Woodcock Initiatives
Mark Banker, Wildlife Biologist, Appalachian Forest Consultants - Wildlife Services
The Wildlife Management Institute currently administers two major wildlife habitat initiatives: The American Woodcock Initiative and the Young Forest Initiative. Both are broad initiatives subdivided regionally in the northeastern half of the U.S., including the Central Appalachian Mountains Region where Pennsylvania is a major contributor to the renewed emphasis on young forest habitat. Targeted species include the American woodcock, golden-winged warbler, Appalachian cottontail, and many other game and non-game species.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Health

American Chestnut Restoration
Sara Fitzsimmons, Regional Science Coordinator, The American Chestnut Foundation
The American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was once a species of great importance to eastern U.S. forests, providing food and shelter for countless wildlife species and supplying Appalachian mountain families with a reliable source of quality timber, tannin and a staple crop. Unfortunately, these benefits were lost during the twentieth century with the accidental importation of chestnut blight, caused by the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica. The compelling story of species collapse and restoration incorporates timely themes including forest stewardship and restoration, the benefits of planting native trees and plants, the perils of introducing exotic flora and fauna, and the ties between our forests and our cultural history. The account of the American chestnuts demise and rebirth can serve as a springboard for hands-on efforts, involving a diverse volunteer base, to help a species in peril. The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) was formed by professional scientists who developed and volunteered to guide a program of traditional backcross breeding, an approach not previously used for chestnut. Many portions of TACFs program are still run almost entirely by volunteers, allowing for unique perspectives and creative solutions that strongly complement professional efforts. To date, TACF volunteers and collaborators have identified and incorporated more than 750 wild American chestnuts in the breeding program, established approximately 500 planting locations and involved close to 250 cooperative partners in American chestnut restoration efforts. With a great reliance on volunteers and citizen scientists, TACFs program provides a model for the conservation and restoration of other forest tree species currently under attack.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Managing Declining Hemlock
Gerald Hoy, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Background about Hemlocks and why it’s such an important species; Why and what hemlocks die from; Insecticide options; Harvesting options for declining stands; Existing hemlock markets; Species to consider when re-planting.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Lessons from the Marcellus Region
Chad Gadsby, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Do you own property in the Marcellus Shale Region? Are you currently or expect to experience natural gas development in your area? Learn from some of the experiences of those who are in the heart of the Marcellus boom.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

A Holistic Approach to Managing Invasive Plants on Your Farm and In Your Woods
Eric Burkhart, Program Director, Plant Science, Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center
The topic of invasive plants can be confusing, contradictory, and even controversial for landowners wondering what, if anything, they should do about invasive plants on their farm or in their woods. This workshop will present current philosophical and practical approaches to thinking about and managing invasive plants on your land. Guidance and considerations relating to the potential impact(s) of invasive plants, control and management strategies, staging and timing of control activities, and restoration of heavily invaded areas will be discussed.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Emerald Ash Borer: Description, Lessons Learned and Management Strategies for Forest Landowners and Managers
Tim Pierson, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension
This presentation will provide a description of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), problems associated with the infestation in Pennsylvania and lessons learned from researchers, scientists, forest landowners and forest resource professionals in Michigan and Ohio. The presentation will conclude by providing forest management strategies for forest landowners and managers to decrease the negative impact of Emerald Ash Borer on forest stands.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Using Web-based Soil Resources
Craig Houghton, Forest Technology Instructor, Penn State Mont Alto
The published Pennsylvania Soil Surveys were great for looking up information about soils. Now there are better sources with the newest soil information: the Web Soil Survey and Soil Data Mart from the Natural Resources Conservation Service and SoilMap from Penn State Cooperative Extension Geospatial Technology Program. Learn how to find information about your forest and farm soils!
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Pests and Their Friendly Counterparts
Beth Brantley, Instructor of Forest Technology, Penn State, Mont Alto
Insects and fungi are everywhere in the woods! Learn to identify harmful and helpful players in your forest community.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Vegetation Management Using Herbicides
David Jackson, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension – Centre County
Forestry labeled herbicides are a low risk and effective means of controlling undesirable forest vegetation. They are used for achieving many objectives including: establishing desirable regeneration, increasing tree growth and timber production, creating and enhancing wildlife habitat, and controlling non-native/invasive plants. This webinar will highlight forestry herbicide application methods, products, and treatment guidelines for controlling competing and invasive vegetation.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 1 Pesticide Certification Credit, Categories 5, 18 & 25; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Tending and Management

ABCs of Managing Woodlots
Jake Schieb, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
This talk will cover some of the basic practices that a landowner can do on their property that can make a significant difference in the long run. The three main topics of the presentation would be quick and easy wildlife habitat projects, TSI work (non-commercial), and invasive species control.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forestry Really Works
Jim Stiehler, Pennsylvania Forestry Association and Retired Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Many times, landowners are confronted with the need to make quick decisions about their forestland - the tax bill comes due, an emergency happens - and there are myriad choices to make. Learn how taking a long range view and matching practices to attaining your land objectives is not only good stewardship of the land, but also financially beneficial.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Working with Your Forest to Meet Your Needs: Silviculture and Forest Management
Susan Stout, Project Leader, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station
Your forest is special to you because of the many ways that you value that forest. It’s also part of a local and global network of forests that have been studied and managed in this country for about a century. Learning the specialized vocabulary of foresters and how that vocabulary relates to your values, needs and plans will help you work with foresters and other specialists to predict and manage changes in your forest.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Tree Planting
Matt Kern and Nathan Fite, Service Foresters, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Everyone strives for a successful tree planting but sometimes survival is low. This presentation will help landowners select the proper location, species, necessary site preparation and maintenance. Tree shelter installation, sizes, types and maintenance will also be covered.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program;0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Creating a Forest Management Plan
Frank Snyder, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
The Forest Management plan is used to provide an overview of a woodland property in the context of a landowner’s needs and objectives. This webinar will focus on the what, where, why, when and how of forest management plans, including short- and long-term forest planning. The parts of a plan outlined include goals, objectives, and avenues to reach them. We will touch on where to find professionals for guidance during the planning process and possible funding opportunities for planning and implementation.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Tree Identification
Tim Latz, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
The Tree ID presentation will consist of the following: Explanation of different leaf types (needle, awl, lobed, and simple); Explanation of opposite, alternate, and whorled branching; Using prominent bark / pith features; Using smell; Different fruits, acorn, samaras, nuts.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Regenerating Hardwood Forests: Managing Competing Plants, Deer, and Light
David Jackson, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension – Centre County
The regeneration, or re-growth, of forests requires that sufficient numbers of desirable trees seedlings become established following a harvest. Oftentimes regeneration of desirable tree seedlings is not easy. Regeneration failures and re-growth of less desirable tree species are common. Competing plants, over-browsing by deer, and insufficient light to the forest floor interfere with tree seedling establishment and growth. Forest sustainability is threatened without adequate forest regeneration. This presentation will provide information on key practices used to successfully establish hardwood forest regeneration.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Woods Safety: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You
Evan Stover, Partner & Business Manager, L & E Stover Enterprises
This presentation will review current chain saw accident statistics to discover who is at the highest risk of being injured while using a chain saw, identify risky behaviors that can lead to these injuries, and discuss practices that can minimize your risk of becoming an accident statistic.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Ecology
Jim Finley, Ibberson Professor of Forest Resources and Director of The Center for Private Forests at Penn State
Ecology, literally the study of house, is in practice the study of the interactions and interdependencies of the nonliving and the living parts of a landscape. Forest ecology focuses on the parts of the landscape where the dominant life forms are trees. During this talk I’ll discuss what is a landscape, what is a forest, what ecosystem services do forest provide for human society, and how can a knowledge of forest ecology enhance management strategies to ensure the continuance of those ecosystem services and meet the goals of the individual landowner. I’ll discuss the process of succession that follows a disturbance event, natural or manmade, and how management can ensure the timely regeneration of the desired mature forest. Finally I’ll discuss some examples of ecological relationships in the forest and how these can be disrupted by invasive and competitive plants.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

LiDAR: A New Tool for Forest Stewardship Planning and Management in Pennsylvania
Mike McGeehin, Geographer, Dewberry Consultants, LLC
PA DCNR and USGS through the PAMAP Program partnered to create a new modern base map of Pennsylvania.  The PAMAP Program finished in 2010 and left a legacy of a statewide coverage of LiDAR data. LiDAR data is a recent development in geospatial data and technology that delivers a significant advancement in calculating the 3-D component of our world. Its main product is an extremely accurate above mean sea level elevation measurement (absolute) from which a user can derive slope, aspect, hillshade (shaded relief) and contour (normally, at a 2 ft interval) layers. These layers can help foresters and forest landowners in making wise decision on where and how to gain access to forest stands and is useful knowledge in forest stewardship planning. A secondary product of LiDAR is an extremely accurate above ground measure (relative) of the features on the ground. This information is useful for foresters and forest landowners in knowing the height of forest stands, the presence of understory shrubs, and assessing the habitat quality of a forest. In GIS all this information can be combined and assimilated into a map that tells a more detailed and informative story of a forest than simply looking at an aerial photograph. This presentation will demonstrate what this new technology offers to foresters and forest landowners.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Promoting Oaks in Degraded Hardwood Stands
Pat Brose, Research Forester, USDA Forest Service
High-value oaks on private lands are often harvested via hi-grading with no forethought or planning for their replacement by other oaks. This hi-grading usually results in stands of greatly diminished ecological and economic value.  Restoring the oak component of these damaged stands is fraught with problems and the remedies can be expensive and geared towards large acreages. This presentation addresses small landowners interested in maintaining or increasing the amount of oak in their woodlots, but don’t have the means to implement large-scale oak regeneration treatments. Items to be discussed include the basic silvics of oaks, inventory procedures, oak maintenance techniques, and methods of regenerating oaks via direct seeding and planting.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Cut to Length (CTL) Harvesting Systems for Flexibility
Bob Hobbes, Consulting Forester, Hobbes Forestry Services
CTL systems provide Flexibility via offering landowners options for: 1) safely salvaging storm damaged trees, 2) harvesting trees at risk due to insects (such as ash with EAB and hemlock with HWA and dead & dying oak from GM), 3) planned harvests or thinnings and 4) wildlife habitat projects, by doing this work on all types of sites and landing accesses. This is a power point presentation with harvesting operations in picture form. It seems we never do a simple stand harvest anymore; it’s always combining work in various stands together and trying to make them viable commercial operations in today’s poor forest products markets. Flexibility with CTL systems can help forest landowners make these operations viable.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE;0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Firewood Cutting and Small Woodlot Management
Mike DiRinaldo, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
This program will discuss the challenges and opportunities found when managing small woodlots. Techniques and options such as fuel wood harvesting will be discussed as well as planning techniques to fit the scale of the operation.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Regenerating Trees Naturally, Understanding the Basic Laws of Biology
Steve Wacker, Assistant District Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
This talk will cover the following principles: something is going to fill that vacant growing space; plants grow where they can, not always where they should; the hour hand moves; working with succession or against it; recognize babies; and hardest of all, visualizing what might be in the future; with practical examples of each.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

PA Prescribed Fire Legislation, Current Prescribed Fire use in PA, and Private Lands Prescribed Fire Implementation
Jenny Case, Fire Management Specialist, The Nature Conservancy, Susan Parry, State Grassland Conservationist, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Mike Pruss, Private Lands Section Chief, Pennsylvania Game Commission
Prescribed fire is a tool that can be used to improve forest health and forested habitats in Pennsylvania. Prior to the PA Prescribed Burning Practices Act (Act 17 of 2009) prescribed fire was used sporadically by practitioners, primarily on non-forested habitats. The Prescribed Burning Practices Act recognized and authorized the use of prescribed fire in the state, allowed for the establishment of standards for implementing prescribed fire, and provided liability protection for users. Today organizations and agencies across the state, often in partnership, are safely implementing prescribed fire in forests, barrens, and grasslands across the state. The number of prescribed burn acres in Pennsylvania has increased on public lands; however some challenges exist to the widespread use of prescribed fire on private lands.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Landowner Resources

The American Forest Foundation – Providing Experts and Ideas for Healthy Woods
Mike Burns, Program Resource Manager, American Forest Foundation
We know that your woods are part of you -- and your family. Keeping them healthy is important, and learning about your woods is the best way to ensure they stay a part of your family for generations to come. Whether you are new to owning woods, or have enjoyed your property for many years, the American Forest Foundation can help you do what's best for your woods by giving you the tools and information you need. Whether it's small, incremental steps to help you learn more about your woods, connecting you to a forester in our wide network of professionals, or updating your management plan, we're here to help.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

QDMA’s Land Certification Program
Kip Adams, Wildlife Biologist & Northeast Regional Director, Quality Deer Management Association
The QDMA’s Land Certification Program recognizes the accomplishments of landowners and sportsmen implementing the four cornerstones of Quality Deer Management (QDM) throughout North America, as well as those committed to ethics, conservation and biodiversity through land stewardship; encourages management practices on participating lands that will enhance deer and other wildlife species, habitat conditions, and hunting experiences by providing incentives, recommendations and/or assistance; and inspires others to engage in sound wildlife management and conservation of our natural resources. The presentation explains what the program involves, the benefits to landowners, and how they can get involved.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program;0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

PA Game Commission’s Private Landowner Assistance Program
Clayton Lutz, Regional Wildlife Diversity Biologist, and Kevin Mountz, Conservation Administration Supervisor, Pennsylvania Game Commission
The PA Game Commission (PGC) is responsible for the management of all wild birds and mammals in Pennsylvania, for current and future generations. The Private Landowners Assistance Program was created in 2004 to provide technical assistance to landowners wishing to manage their properties for wildlife identified as Species of Greatest Conservation Need. A biologist in each PGC region is available to assist landowners develop a habitat management plan and to connect landowners with funding opportunities or other assistance programs. One such assistance opportunity is the PGC’s Hunter Access Program.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Using Your BOF Service Foresters; They are Here to Serve You
Andy Duncan, Private Forestland Stewardship Coordinator, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
The DCNR-BOF service Foresters are professionals who specialize in helping landowners manage their land responsibly and effectively. These foresters give sound advice and planning assistance upon request.  We will discuss the various ways in which you can utilize the talents of the service forester in your county.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pennsylvania Forestry Association: What have we done? And what can we do for you?
Linda Finley, Past President, Pennsylvania Forestry Association
The Pennsylvania Forestry Association is the oldest conservation organization in the state. Learn about their history and activities and how they influenced the conservation movement. Discover the resources and information the organization has to share with you as you care for your piece of Penn's Woods.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Conservation Volunteer Opportunities:  Showcasing the Skills, Expertise, and Dedication of Volunteers and Opportunities to Volunteer for Nature’s Sake. 
Molly Anderson, PA Program Volunteer Manager, The Nature Conservancy
 “Conservation Volunteer Opportunities …” is designed to engage the audience on how to make new friends through meaningful volunteer activities while learning about nature. The workshop will also provide real-life examples of inspiring volunteer success stories from the field.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Woodland Owners Associations
Fred Peabody, Pennsylvania Forest Landowner
Pennsylvania has over 25 regional and county woodland owners associations. These groups were started to provide a voice and educational opportunities for forest landowners within a community. Discover the resources and information the organizations have to share with you as you care for your piece of Penn's Woods.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Wood Products

Making the Grade

Lee Stover, Partner & Lead Consultant, L & E Stover Enterprises
This presentation will discuss the relationship between lumber grades, log grades, and tree grades as an aid to the decision making process, when looking to improve the timber quality of your wood lot.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Processing Your Own Wood Products
Scott Weikert, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension, and Marty Parsons, Regional Representative, Wood-Mizer
Presentation will include a discussion about tree and log quality, juvenile and reaction wood, sawing patterns, and air drying lumber.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Charcoal- a Product from Your Woodlot
Gary Gilmore, Service Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
The first question raised is “What is charcoal used for and why should I be interested in it as a product derived from my woods?” My presentation and demonstration is designed to answer that question and show how this product can be made and used by the landowners. This presentation will introduce people to what charcoal is, how it was used historically, the growing movement to use charcoal as a means to sequester carbon and as biochar.  I will also show how charcoal can be used as a poor man’s gasoline to power equipment and how to make charcoal at home.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Solar Kiln and Wood Drying
Scott Weikert, Forest Resources Extension Educator, Penn State Cooperative Extension
Presentation will include identifying the parts of a solar kiln, very basic drying theory, and how lumber can be dried using a solar kiln.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE.

Making Your Woods Accessible

Obtaining Private Forestland Information in the 21st Century
Brent Harding, Forester, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Quick digital acquisition of private forestland attributes is becoming more accessible and mobile with each passing day. Armed with a fast internet connection, a contemporary computer and a willingness to explore federal, state and local websites a landowner or natural resource professional can rapidly assess private forestland from a desktop computer, a tablet computer or a mobile smartphone. Join me as I demonstrate how to marry emerging software technologies with consumer-grade hardware to evaluate and manage private forestlands.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Planning, Building, and Maintaining Access to Your Forest
Tony Quadro, Forester, Westmoreland County Conservation District
Following are some topics which could be included in the presentation: benefits of access to your forest, choosing the best location for access, laying out and building the road, type of equipment for the type of road, erosion control plans, potential permits needed, timing of building the road, timber harvesting access, dealing with gas drillers and access, road BMP's, soils, sensitive areas, crossing streams and wetlands, PNDI, dealing with agencies, consultants, firebreaks, legal issues, unwanted access, invasive species on roads, stabilizing and maintaining the road, fixing existing problems, and where to get help.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forests and Water

Healthy Forests, Healthy Waters
Craig Highfield, Coordinator, Forestry for the Bay
Pennsylvania has more miles of streams than any state in the contiguous United States. Woodlands are, by far, the most beneficial land use for promoting and maintaining clean water not only for our streams, rivers and estuaries like the Chesapeake Bay but also for our faucets. This presentation will focus on how our activities on the land influence life downstream.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Water in the Forest
Bryan Swistock, Water Resources Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Water is a vital but often overlooked component of any natural landscape. This presentation explains how water moves through a typical forested watershed and how increasing climatic variability can influence water resources. Natural and man-made influences to both water quantity and water quality in groundwater, streams, springs and ponds will also be addressed.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pond and Lake Management
Bryan Swistock, Water Resources Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Pennsylvania is home to hundreds of thousands of natural and man-made ponds and lakes. When managed properly, these waterbodies can provide important ecosystem services along with valuable recreation to the landowner. This presentation focuses on all aspects of pond and lake management including water supply, construction, maintenance, water quality, aquatic plants, fisheries and wildlife.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Trees for Streams: Essential Connection between Healthy Streams and Riparian Forests
Stephanie Eisenbise, Stream Buffer Specialist, Chesapeake Bay Foundation
For years, researchers have known that healthy forests bordering streams are highly effective at preventing numerous pollutants from reaching the water. New research has shown that streamside forests also multiply the streams ability to cleanse itself of many of the pollutants that do make their way into the water. Learn how you can establish healthy streamside forests on your land that can increase wildlife habitat and improve water quality for your local streams and rivers.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Protecting Water Resources near Gas Drilling Activity
Bryan Swistock, Water Resources Extension Specialist, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Marcellus and Utica gas drilling activity has generated numerous questions and concerns about impacts on water resources of Pennsylvania. Shale gas drilling requires large amounts of freshwater which, in turn, produce large quantities of contaminated wastewater. Proper collection and disposal of waste fluids are especially important to protect the one million private water wells and springs that provide drinking water for over three million residents of the state. Finally, the location of drilling is important to protect surface streams, groundwater and wetlands. This presentation will discuss each of these issues including the current state regulations related to each topic and voluntary measures that landowners can perform to protect their water resources.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Stream Health Assessment
Zack Roeder, Forest Resource Planner, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Stroud Water Research Center developed leaf pack experiments which involve creating artificial leaf packs (dry leaves in a mesh bag), placing it in a stream, examining the packs, and discovering aquatic insects. This presentation will introduce the use of leaf pack experiments as an indicator of stream health, and their use as an educational tool.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Aesthetics and Biodiversity

Reintroducing American Chestnut to Pennsylvania
Leila Pinchot, Research Fellow, Pinchot Institute
The American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was an ecologically and economically important tree species in the eastern US before the arrival of the non-native chestnut blight fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) in the late 19th century. Through a labor-intensive breeding program, two organizations; The American Chestnut Foundation and The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station; are close to producing highly blight-resistant chestnut seedlings. In anticipation of the widespread availability of blight-resistant chestnuts, it is necessary to understand how to reintroduce the species to the forests of Pennsylvania. This workshop will discuss American chestnut ecology and site preference in the context of establishing chestnut reintroduction plantings in Pennsylvania forests. Additionally, the workshop will detail plans for a reintroduction study on The Nature Conservancy’s Brush Mountain Woodland.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE;0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pros and Cons of Industrial Wind Projects
Laura Jackson, Pennsylvania Forest Landowner
Forest landowners have many choices on how to manage their woodlands. If wind speeds are high enough, landowners may consider leasing their forested property to an industrial wind developer. Find out the pros and cons of leasing woodlands for an industrial wind project. Examples of wind leases, the financial benefits to landowners, as well as impacts to the forest ecology will be discussed. Photographs of industrial wind projects in Pennsylvania will illustrate how current wind projects impact forested habitats.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Timber Harvesting Aesthetics
Chuck Coup, Program Manager, Pennsylvania Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Timber harvesting operations represent a disturbance in forests that can impact visual quality. This presentation will address why timber harvesting aesthetics are an important consideration, discuss managing expectations, and will provide information on minimizing the disruptive effects that cutting and removing trees have on a forest.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Managing Your Forest for Biodiversity
Roy Brubaker, District Forester, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Forests are full of life. The decisions we make about managing our forests; even the decision to "just let it be natural" will impact the diversity of life that our forests will support both today, and into the future. This talk will examine what makes our forests so biologically diverse, the inherent trade-offs in types of biodiversity that are inevitable in forest decision making. We will end with some examples of woodlot management scenarios designed to practically achieve biodiversity related goals and objectives.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pennsylvania Natural Diversity Inventory
Rebecca Bowen, Ecological Services Section Chief, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
This session will present a primer on how to use the Pennsylvania Natural Diversity Inventory (PNDI) tool, about the data the tool houses, and how to coordinate with agencies. The session will also share information on how agencies can help provide useful information for landowners who want to manage their forests, including providing information on rare species and their management to be included in the plans.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE;0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Natural Heritage Areas: A Tool for Forest Biodiversity Conservation
David Yeany, Conservation Planning Specialist/Ornithologist, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
An important part of any good forest management strategy is recognizing and protecting special sites in your woods – especially areas that have biological significance or that support rare, threatened, or endangered species and natural communities. Certification processes through both the American Tree Farm System and the Forest Stewardship Council require forest management plans to include measures for maintaining and preserving areas of high conservation value. Learn how the Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program has worked with private forest landowners to create plans for biodiversity conservation through the use of Natural Heritage Areas – a publicly available statewide dataset of critical habitat for species and natural communities of concern, and how you can do the same with your own forest.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Discovering Pennsylvania’s Forest Wildflowers and Rare Plants
Kelly Sitch, Ecological Program Specialist, DCNR Bureau of Forestry
Pennsylvania’s forests provide habitat for hundreds of wildflower species. This session will introduce common forest wildflowers and some of the state’s rare plant species, while discussing where and when to look for these species in your woods.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE;0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Pennsylvania’s Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Forest Dwellers
Charlie Eichelberger, Herpetologist, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
From the top of the canopy to the depths of caves, Pennsylvania’s current biodiversity landscape has been influenced by natural resource extraction. In many cases, today’s forest management can serve a critical role in maintaining and enhancing populations and habitats of Pennsylvania’s rare, threatened, and endangered species. With over 70% of Pennsylvania’s forests under private ownership, the Commonwealths natural heritage legacy relies on the sound land-use of our private forest stewards.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Forest Policy and Advocacy

Federal Policy Implications to Private Forest Landowners
Scott Jones, CEO, Forest Landowners Association
From Logging Roads to the Indiana Bat, private forest landowners face an ever increasing amount of policy issues that will shape our ownership and management. Learn the latest issues and what you can do to influence the discussion and ensure the legacy of your forest.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 1; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Municipal Zoning and Subdivision and Land Development Ordinances: What a Forest Landowner Should Know
Bill Elmendorf, Associate Professor, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Based on the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code, this presentation will provide a brief overview of zoning and subdivision and land development ordinances including how they work together to regulate subdivision and other development. The presentation will then introduce and discuss timber harvest, tree preservation, riparian area, and other zoning ordinances commonly used in Pennsylvania to conserve natural resources.  The discussion will include problems municipalities have had enacting and enforcing these ordinances.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Landowner Liability and Trespass
Mike Jacobson, Professor of Forest Resources, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Protecting and maintaining woodlands requires an understanding of the laws pertaining to landowner liability. We will discuss Pennsylvania law on various parties accessing woodlands. Related topics include timber theft, contracts, working with professionals, and dealing with local ordinances.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.

Advocacy 101 for Family Forest Owners
Christine Cadigan, Manager, Public Affairs, American Forest Foundation
During this presentation, family forest owners will learn the latest information on national policy issues that may affect the health, productivity and future of their family forest. American Tree Farm System national staff will provide information on the latest policy happenings and tips on being an effective advocate. Finally, learn tools of the trade from Pennsylvania Tree Farmer of the Year Susan Benedict, and hear just how easy being an advocate really can be.
Approved for: 1.0 CFE credit, Category 2; 1 credit hour Pennsylvania SFI® CE; 0.75 CEU International Society of Arboriculture Certification Program; 0.75 CEU American Society of Landscape Architects.