Share

Forest tree species and populations responses to changes in climate

We are modeling species- and population-level growth responses to changes in climate using provenance and common garden tests data. These are experiments in spatial climate change where the climate at which the seed source has originated differs from that of the test site. When populations are tested in several sites, differences in growth responses to changes in climate can be elucidated. These models are providing crucial insights on species and populations phenotypic responses to climate change as well as guidelines for seed transfer under an adaptive management context.
Two white spruce provenances growing a few feet apart in a provenance test in Quebec

Two white spruce provenances growing a few feet apart in a provenance test in Quebec

Related Publications

Rehfeldt, G.E., B.C. Jaquish, J. López-Uptonc, C. Sáenz-Romerod, J.B. St Claire, L. Leites, and D.G. Joyce. 2014. Comparative Genetic Responses to Climate for the Varieties of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii: Realized Climate Niches. Forest Ecology and Management. 324: 126-137.

Rehfeldt, G.E, L. Leites, J. B. St Clair, B.C. Jaquish, C. Saenz-Romero, J. Lopez-Upton, D.G. Joyce. 2014. Comparative Genetic Responses to Climate in the Varieties of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii: Clines in Growth Potential. Forest Ecology and Management. 324: 138-146.

Rehfeldt, G.E., B.C. Jaquish, C. Saenz-Romero, D.G. Joyce, L. Leites, J.B. St Clair, J. Lopez-Upton. 2014. Comparative genetic responses to climate in the varieties of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii: reforestation. Forest Ecology and Management. 324: 147-157.

Leites, L., G. Rehfeldt, A. Robinson, N. Crookston, B. Jaquish. 2012. Possibilities and limitations of using historic provenance tests to infer forest species growth responses to climate change. Natural Resource Modeling. 25(3): 409-433.

Leites, L., A. Robinson, G. Rehfeldt, J. Marshall, N. Crookston. 2012. Height-growth response to climatic changes differ among populations of Douglas-fir: a novel analysis of historic data. Ecological Applications. 22(1): 154-165.