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Jing Wang

Controls over Belowground Net Primary Productivity and Root Lifespan in Inner Monogolian Grasslands and Apple Orchards
Jing collecting images of apple roots with a special camera inserted into a clear plastic tube

Jing collecting images of apple roots with a special camera inserted into a clear plastic tube

Summary

Rapid N deposition may affect the structure, function, and stability of ecosystems. Across China, N deposition was found to increase by 59% over the last ten years. Belowground net primary productivity (BNPP), as a major source of organic carbon input into the soil, should be included in evaluating ecosystem responses to resource availability from the whole plant perspective. Additionally, the turnover of fine roots is a crucial part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. My experiment was set up in the Inner Mongolian grassland by using ingrowth core to measure BNPP and root windows to estimate fine root turnover.

Another project I am working on focuses on apple roots. With fruit production, only limited carbohydrates are available to apple roots. When aboveground carbon demand is high, roots may respond with more efficient strategy to forage nutrient. For example, they would extend lifespan in nutrient-rich patch. With minirhizotron experiment, I am able to know the longevity of apple roots and how it changes with carbon limitation in nutrient-rich patches.

Education

Visiting student, The Pennsylvania State University, 2016 to present
Ph.D candidate in Ecology, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2011 to present
B.S., Ecology, Yunnan University, China. 2011