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Structural Complexity in Old-Growth

Eric Zenner, R. Akhavan, K. Sagheb-Talebi, Steve Acker, Bill Emmingham, B. Commarmot, M. Hobi

How do you characterize the structural complexity of a forested stand? One approach is to evaluate the relationship of a tree to its neighboring trees and determine the degree of difference (the gradient) in the magnitude of the diameter or height.

Publications:

Zenner, E.K., J.E. Peck, M.L. Hobi, and B. Commarmot.  2015.  The dynamics of structure across a primeval European beech stand.  Forestry, in press.

Zenner, E.K., K. Sagheb-Talebi, R. Akhavan, and J.E. Peck.  2015.  Integration of small-scale canopy dynamics smoothes live-tree structural complexity across development stages in old-growth Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) forests at the multi-gap scale.  Forest Ecology and Management 335:26-36.

Akhavan, R., K. Sagheb-Talebi, E.K. Zenner, F. Safavimanesh. 2012. Spatial patterns in different forest development stages of an intact old-growth Oriental beech forest in the Caspian region of Iran. European Journal of Forest Research 131:1355-1366.

Zenner, E.K. 2004. Does old-growth condition imply high live-tree structural complexity? Forest Ecology and Management 195:243-258.

Zenner, E.K., S.A. Acker, and W.H. Emmingham. 1998. Growth reduction in harvest-age coniferous forests with residual trees in the western central Cascade Range of Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management 102:75-88.

Acker, S.A., E.K. Zenner, and W.H. Emmingham.  1998. Structure and yield of two-aged stands on the Willamette National Forest, Oregon: Implications for green-tree retention. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 28:749-758.