Share

How Much Do I Know About Water?

Keywords: transparent, absorb, universal solvent, solvent, dense, polar, adhesion, cohesive forces; Lesson Plan Grade Level: sixth grade; Total Time Required for Lesson: 50 minutes; Setting: science classroom

Goals for the Lesson

  • Students will learn that water is the universal solvent.
  • Students will explore ways to prove the properties of water.
  • Students will study the chemistry of water.

Materials Needed

  • copies of pages 7 and 8 of Incredible Water with the Water Lion for each student
  • overhead of part 1 of Activity 5 on page 9 of Incredible Water with the Water Lion
  • wax paper
  • about $10.00 of pennies
  • small Dixie cups (bathroom size)
  • water
  • blank paper
  • medicine droppers
  • toothpicks

State Standards Addressed: E & E Standards: Watersheds and Wetlands (4.1.7.C); Science and Technology Standards: Chemistry (3.2.7.A)

Teaching Model: Focus, Explore, Reflect, Apply

Topics: the properties of water

Doing the Activity

  1. First, list the keywords on the board and ask students for definitions. Ask them to use dictionaries or the glossary of their science books if they need help. Then have the class brainstorm everything they know about water. List ideas on the blackboard. Next distribute the handout and tie the oral parts of the lesson together by reading and discussing the five properties of water.
  2. Students then work with a partner to do part 1 or Activity 5 on page 9. Put the instructions on an overhead for a few minutes until all are working. Ask one member of each group to describe how the water drop behaved.
  3. Finally, review with students that water has cohesive forces, will adhere to surfaces, and add that there are also spaces between the molecules. These spaces can't be seen, but the next activity will prove that they are there. Working with a partner students are to fill a cup till they can't get another drop in it. Then they are to guess how many pennies they can put into the cup before it overflows. After writing down their guesses the students are to begin adding pennies to the cup. Keep adding pennies until the cup runs over. Discuss the results.

Assessment (Evaluation)

  • Observe application of new concepts as students complete activities
  • Ask open-ended questions throughout the lesson.

Conclusion

  • Discuss the results of both activities and assess understanding of the new concepts presented. How can these concepts be applied to our everyday lives? (Note: Since I will use this lesson toward the end of my chemistry unit, there should be a lot of jelling of concepts.)

References

Drohan, Joy R., and Charles Abdalla (2000). Valuing Pennsylvania's Water Resources. University Park, Pa.: The Pennsylvania State University.

Drohan, Joy R., William E. Sharpe, and Sanford S. Smith (2001). Water Conservation with the Water Lion: The 4-H water Project Unit 1. University Park, Pa.: Center for Watershed Stewardship, The Pennsylvania State University.

Drohan, Joy R., William E. Sharpe, and Sanford S. Smith (2002). Incredible Water with the Water Lion: 4-H Water Project Unit 2. University Park, Pa.: Center for Watershed Stewardship, The Pennsylvania State University.

Swistock, Bryan, and Sanford S. Smith (2001). From the Woods: Watersheds. University Park, Pa.: The Pennsylvania State University.

Author

Connie J. Frazier, Hollidaysburg School District, Hollidaysburg, PA