Faculty and students develop and utilize new data products, remote sensing tools, and computational systems that enable breakthroughs in scaling up, in order to enhance the social value of natural landscapes and better understand ecological relationships and social tradeoffs at different scales.

Management needs to be relevant and applied at larger scales. New data products, remote sensing tools, and computational systems are enabling breakthroughs in scaling up. Efforts to enhance the social value of natural landscapes and mitigate harms to these landscapes requires actors that have the ability to understand ecological relationships and social tradeoffs at different scales. From a justice and public policy perspective, a poor understanding of scalar effects on environmental and social systems can lead to the unfair distribution of environmental positives (e.g., enhanced services) and negatives (e.g., invasive species). Economic and environmental justice issues often lead to polarized positions and stagnation in developing policies to address the issue. Spatial technology and simulation programs have the potential to inform not only scientists and land managers but also the public and decision-makers. Landscape-scale perspectives are desperately needed to help advance solutions to grand challenges that involve diverse actors and cross political boundaries.

Faculty Working in this Area

Researchers in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management working in the area of Scaling Up Ecosystem Management.