Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

Offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in Soil Science, Forest Resources (forestry), Wood Products, and Wildlife and Fisheries Science.

Latest Ecosystem Science and Management News

Victoria Braithwaite to be memorialized with new ecology research award
July 6, 2020
The University's ecology community will memorialize faculty member Victoria Braithwaite, who died last year, with a new research excellence award named in her honor that will recognize one student each year for their published ecology research.
Sunnier but riskier
June 24, 2020
Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes — whose venom is used in anticoagulants and other medical treatments — are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study by researchers at Penn State and the University of Scranton.
Penn State Extension webinar series to explore topics on private water supplies
June 22, 2020
A Penn State Extension webinar series, which begins June 24 and continues through Aug. 12, will help rural homeowners address common water supply management problems. "Approximately 3 million Pennsylvanians — mostly in rural homes and on farms — use a private well, spring or cistern for their drinking water," said Bryan Swistock, extension water resources specialist. "Penn State research has shown that about 40% of private water supplies fail at least one health-based drinking water standard, and many others suffer from aesthetic water quality issues."
Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage
June 10, 2020
A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to Penn State researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania.
Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop
June 8, 2020
Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why. A Pennsylvania research team investigated whether pathogens, parasites, environmental contaminants and disease may be contributing to this decline.