This presentation will discuss concepts of “forest hydrology” which is defined as the movement of water within forested watersheds.

It's estimated that about 80 trillion gallons of fresh groundwater occur below Pennsylvania and we withdraw about 1 billion gallons of groundwater daily for homes, farms and businesses. About half of Pennsylvania's population get at least part of their drinking water directly from groundwater. But the exact processes for recharge of groundwater aquifers and the importance of land use and forested watersheds for protection of groundwater quantity and quality is often overlooked. This presentation will discuss concepts of "forest hydrology" which is defined as the movement of water within forested watersheds. Specifically, the importance of infiltration and recharge to groundwater will be explained along with how forested land facilitates the processes that supply groundwater aquifers. The connection between natural forest processes and current stormwater management practices will also be discussed. These practices seek to mimic forest processes to ensure adequate groundwater recharge, reduce surface water runoff, and protect groundwater quality in urbanizing areas.

Presented by: Bryan Swistock, Water Resources Specialist, Penn State Extension, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

The Importance of Forests to Water Resources

Center for Private Forests

Address

416 Forest Resources Building
University Park, PA 16802

Center for Private Forests

Address

416 Forest Resources Building
University Park, PA 16802